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Electrical Engineering Technician

Kingston Campus | Program Code: 1050 | Open for International Students
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Overview

Today’s electrical field is extremely broad and diverse. Employers need motivated people who have the knowledge and skills to design, implement and maintain power generation, distribution and control systems, entertainment and communication systems, and process, automation and manufacturing systems.

The Electrical Engineering Technician program will provide students with the theoretical and practical skills required to meet these demanding job opportunities. Graduates of the Electrical Engineering Technician Program will have a well-rounded practical and theoretical knowledge of many aspects of the electrical field.

Some areas of study will include, but are not limited to the following:

  • Canadian Electrical Code usage and application
  • Reading and creating blueprints, schematics, and wiring diagrams
  • Residential, commercial, and industrial wiring
  • Industrial process measurement, calibration, and control
  • Power electronics with application to power and motor speed control equipment
  • Industrial automation systems with programmable logic controllers and motor control equipment
  • Power generation and distribution equipment
  • Fire alarm, security, and communication systems

Program Details

Code 1050
Start Date May, September
Credential Ontario College Diploma
Campus Kingston
Program Length 2 Years
Delivery Full-Time
Open for international students
Special May Intake - International Students Only

Program Highlights

At the completion of the program, graduates may apply to write exemption tests to provide an exemption from the in-school portion of the Ontario Electrical Apprenticeships. These tests are administered by SLC and are free of charge to all graduates of the Electrical Engineering Technician program.

Program Outline

2020-2021

This course provides students with an understanding of the basic principles of electrical theory in order to analyze and design electrical circuits. Topics covered include atomic structure, static electricity, sources of Electromotive Force, batteries, simple electrical circuits, conventional and electron flow, the principles of voltage, current, resistance, work, power and energy. Flux density, reluctance, permeance, permeability, magnetism, magnets and magnetic flux are also be covered. Ohm's and Kirchhoff's Laws are used to analyze series, parallel, combination and three-wire distribution circuits and the effects of electricity upon the human body.

From this course, students gain practical knowledge of how simple AC and DC circuits are designed and constructed, how to measure current, voltage, power, and frequency, and the proper safety procedures when working with electricity. Students wire a residential electrical service and ancillary equipment, and low voltage signaling systems. Students examine wiring types and requirements, electrical enclosures and conduits, and apply protection and grounding methods. Students also demonstrate the safe and proper handling and storage of hand tools, and electrical materials commonly used in the electrical industry.

Upon completion of this course, students are able to obtain information from architectural, structural and electrical blueprints, specifications, building codes and apply the Canadian Electrical Code to complete an electrical installation for a single-family dwelling. In addition, students identify and interpret alphanumerical lines and use the metric and imperial scales and are able to convert between them, draw and label a panel schematic for a single-family dwelling. Students prepare a material take off for a single-family dwelling using drawings, specifications and prepare sketches to solve and document construction problems and solutions.

This course is designed to provide the necessary mathematical skills relevant to the requirements of industry. Technical applications are emphasized with topics including: use of a scientific calculator, operations with real numbers, algebra, ratio and proportion, measurement conversion, vector additional and trigonometry.

This course introduces students to digital logic circuits and the tools of design and analysis. Students are provided the opportunity to design, assemble, and troubleshoot digital logic circuits. The topics covered include logic gates, Transistor-Transistor-Logic (TTL) and Complementary-Metal-Oxide-Semiconductor (CMOS) logic circuits, logic expressions, Boolean algebra, circuit simplification, sequential circuits, digital interfaces and communications, and data transmission.

The object of this course is to introduce the Canadian Electrical Code Book (CEC) as it applies to electrical installations. Students develop an understanding of the layout of the Canadian Electrical Code Book in order to locate specific code rules. Students interpret and apply the rules and tables referencing the CEC book appendices and diagrams as necessary.

This technical communications course focuses on communicating effectively in a variety of formats including technical reports, and project management reports. Topics covered include clarity of communication, appropriate formats, and the mechanics of correct syntax, grammar, punctuation, and spelling. In addition, students are introduced to project management tools and learn to prepare basic reports using these tools.

This is a course designed to help students adapt to the rapidly changing workplace. It provides an historical overview of our working society and how it has evolved. Issues such as employment equity, harassment, regulation of health and safety, unionization, professional organizations and codes of ethics are discussed. Students also identify strategies to meet the needs of current employers and to make interview processes work to their advantage.

This course is an introduction to magnetism, electromagnetism, and their application with respect to direct current generators and motors.

Upon completion of this course, students are able to determine utility location and site features using site drawings, methods of construction using architectural and structural drawings, and the electrical characteristics for commercial facilities. Topics covered include the layout of mechanical equipment and systems, commercial distribution and service equipment. Wiring and branch circuits for lighting and equipment are also covered. Students prepare a material take off for a commercial installation, using drawings, specifications, and applying the Canadian Electrical Code (CEC). Students prepare sketches to solve and document construction problems and solutions, as well as prepare as-built drawings and develop basic single line, schematic, and wiring diagrams.

Upon completion of this course, students are able to determine utility location and site features using site drawings, methods of construction using architectural and structural drawings, and the electrical characteristics for commercial facilities. Topics covered include the layout of mechanical equipment and systems, commercial distribution and service equipment. Wiring and branch circuits for lighting and equipment are also covered. Students prepare a material take off for a commercial installation, using drawings, specifications, and applying the Canadian Electrical Code (CEC). Students prepare sketches to solve and document construction problems and solutions, as well as prepare as-built drawings and develop basic single line, schematic, and wiring diagrams.

In this course, students gain the experience to interpret the ULC standard for the installation of a complete Fire Alarm System and connect, test, and troubleshoot a non-addressable fire alarm system. Students learn the various types of input and output devices, as well as ancillary and supervisory circuitries. They are introduced to the basic operation of wet and dry sprinkler systems and other forms of suppression systems used in the industry. Students are introduced to a basic security system.

This course will provide students with an opportunity to design, construct, analyze, and troubleshoot analog circuits. The topics covered include resistors, capacitors, semiconductors, diodes, transistors, transistor switches, and timers.

This course expands knowledge of the Canadian Electrical Code (CEC) by exploring trade specific sections while reinforcing previously gained knowledge from your CEC Level 1 studies. Students become proficient in locating, interpreting and applying Code Rules in the following sections: motor protection, multi-unit residential dwellings, commercial applications, and hazardous locations.

This course provides students with a basic introduction to instrumentation, an overview of the common types of processes, and a more detailed study of temperature and pressure processes and equipment as used in the industry.

This course introduces network terminology, network media, Network Interface Card (NIC), and various topologies and architectures. Simple and Complex Network operations, Ethernet, Protocols, and Network Operating Systems are discussed. Local Area Network (LAN) and Wide Area Network (WAN) are introduced and the enterprise and distributed network technology (internet) are introduced. Students develop skills in troubleshooting systems such as audio, video, and data systems and their relevant interfaces.

N/A

This course provides the practical applications of connecting and examining the operation of AC motors and alternators. Topics covered include identifying the parts of AC machines, the design and installation of single-phase and three-phase AC motor and alternator circuits, forward and reverse control, capacitive, split winding and wye / delta starting, wound rotor motors, and voltage, current, power and load measurements of AC motors and alternators.

This course will provide the practical applications of connecting and examining the operation of AC motors and alternators. Topics covered will include identifying the parts of AC machines, the design and installation of single-phase and three-phase AC motor and alternator circuits, forward and reverse control, capacitive, split winding and wye / delta starting, wound rotor motors, and voltage, current, power and load measurements of AC motors and alternators.

This course will provide students with an understanding of the electronic components and circuits used to provide AC and DC power control. Students will demonstrate the ability to design, assemble, and analyze power control circuits. The topics covered include rectifiers, filters, regulators, linear and switch-mode single-phase and three-phase power supplies, SCRs, Phase Shifting SCRs, diacs, triacs, and phase shifting triacs.

This course continues the study of process control and instrumentation by examining, constructing, and operating level, flow and motion processes. Students have an opportunity to use actual industry equipment on fully functional process simulators.

This course introduces students to programmable logic controllers (PLCs) and their uses in industrial automation. In this course students state the functions and applications of Programmable Logic Controllers (PLCs). Students learn to determine the language and addressing requirements of a PLC and demonstrate the programming of common relay instructions, timers, counters, mathematic functions, and word comparisons within a PLC. Students learn proper methods of safe, acceptable programming practices including clear documentation and identify methods of installing a PLC system and perform hard wiring of PLCs to equipment. Students also demonstrate methods of testing PLC inputs and outputs and design programs to operate machines in a desired manner using many of the internal functions of a PLC.

An Electrical Technician is frequently required to interpret and prepare information in a graphical format. This course outlines the concepts and techniques of producing computer-generated drawings.

This course will introduce the students to the physical laws and principals governing hydraulics and pneumatics. The student will learn how to identify the schematic symbols and components used in hydraulic and pneumatic circuits. Safe working practices will be stressed throughout the course. Upon completion of the course, the student will have gained enough knowledge to assemble, operate, and troubleshoot hydraulic and pneumatic systems.

N/A

In this course, students learn about the installation details for an industrial construction project from a complete set of architectural and electrical drawings and specifications. Topics covered include the layout of single and three phase systems for feeder and branch circuits from utility supply to utilization points. Students apply the grounding and bonding requirements for high-voltage indoor and outdoor substations and vaults using the Canadian Electrical Code (CEC). In addition, students identify precautions for installing stress cones, the requirements for terminating shielded and concentric neutral high-voltage cables, and the testing methods and safety requirements for testing high-voltage cables. Students prepare a material take off using drawings, specifications and prepare sketches to document construction projects. Students learn to prepare as-built drawings and interpret basic single line, schematic, and wiring diagrams.

This course will examine the power distribution systems used to transmit anddistribute electrical energy.

This practical lab-based course provides students with an introduction to the connection and operation of power distribution systems as used to transmit and distribute electrical energy by industry.

In this course, students practice the disassembly and assembly of components that are installed in a Wind Turbine. Learners document pertinent information using appropriate terminology and graphics to provide comprehensive reports. Students learn safe use of the torque and tension tooling, rigging and hoisting, and disassembly of turbine components. Learners follow detailed instructions to practice oil change and preventative maintenances. Students collaborate team members, and learn to communicate, to stay organized, and to remain productive.

This course provides students with an understanding of the operation of AC and DC variable speed drives, as well as their installation and programming. Students demonstrate how to select the correct sized motor, drive, wiring and protection for an application, how to install a variable speed drive system, program and tune it. Topics covered include the examination of the electronic circuits used to construct AC and DC variable speed drives, feedback circuits, and examination of programmable drive parameters and how they affect drive operation.

This course expands understanding of the Canadian Electrical Code (CEC) by exploring trade specific sections while reinforcing your previously gained knowledge from your CEC Level 2 studies. Topics covered include motor overcurrent and overload protection, conductor sizing and protection for transformers, welders, capacitors and high voltage installations.

This course provides students with the skills necessary for wiring, interfacing, programming, and operating state of the art Allen Bradley programmable logic controllers and human machine interfaces (HMI). This course gives students the opportunity to apply skills to safely create project applications in machine design and troubleshooting techniques.

Requirements

Admission Requirements

Ontario Secondary School Diploma (OSSD) or equivalent including the following prerequisites:

  • Grade 12 English at the C or U level
  • Grade 11 Math at the C or U or M level

For OSSD equivalency options, see Admission Requirements.

If you are missing prerequisite courses, enroll in the Career/College Prep program, free for Ontario residents who are 19 years or older.

Fees

2020-2021

Tuition
Program Fees
Ancillary Fees
Total
CAD
Tuition
$2,721.36 CAD
Program Fees
$0.00 CAD
Ancillary Fees
$1,390.92 CAD
Total
$4,112.28 CAD

Tuition fees are subject to change pending confirmation of provincial Ministry Funding rates for 2021-2022.

Tuition
Program Fees
Ancillary Fees
Total
CAD
Tuition
$14,600.00 CAD
Program Fees
$0.00 CAD
Ancillary Fees
$2,102.25 CAD
Total
$16,702.25 CAD

Tuition fees are subject to change pending confirmation of provincial Ministry Funding rates for 2021-2022.

Kingston

Our Kingston campus has seen significant renovation over the past few years, including a brand new Student Life and Innovation Centre that houses a new gymnasium, fitness centre, pub, and more.

New Gym
Kingston Campus Exterior
Kingston Campus

Career Opportunities

Electrical Engineering Technician: Whether designing a factory or a small piece of consumer equipment, Electrical Engineering Technicians are actively involved in absolutely every part of our modern society. They work closely with engineering and architectural staff towards the common goal of designing the devices and structures that make our everyday lives easier.

Industrial Electrician: In today’s automated manufacturing facilities, employers demand well-educated and highly skilled employees to maintain plant operations and improve productivity levels. Certified industrial electricians, in cooperation with engineers, industrial millwrights, operators, and quality control technicians, are key to filling this demand. Graduates of this program will acquire the foundational skills to succeed in this evolving and challenging environment.

Construction and Maintenance Electrician: The construction industry is diverse. Since a construction site can be anything from a residential home to a nuclear generating station – each with its own service types and installation practices – construction electricians are equipped to handle this diversity in a highly skilled and professional manner. Working in coordination with engineering and other trades, a construction electrician can deal with all aspects of electrical installation from start to finish.

Testimonials

"The Electrical Engineering Technician program at St Lawrence College, Kingston Campus has given me a fantastic opportunity to expand my electrical knowledge. The program as a whole covers many different aspects of electrical, process control and electronics."
Jessica Nyysola
"The practical hands-on labs allow you to apply what you have learned in theory class, as well as teach you how to wire increasingly complex circuits safely and according to electrical code. The instructors are knowledgeable about the course content and emphasize how what you are learning is used in the workplace. "
Wayne Roberts

Other Information

Additional Costs

Students will also be required to purchase textbooks, electronic kits, green CSA triangle, and orange OMEGA symbol safety boots and hand tools. The approximate cost of all items is $1,300.

Program Contacts

Program Contact

Jay Krawchuk
jkrawchuk@sl.on.ca
613.544.5400 ext. 1627

Admissions Information

Contact a member of our recruitment team
ask@sl.on.ca
1.800.463.0752 and ask for Recruiting

International Students Contact

international@sl.on.ca
+1 613.544.5400 ext. 5514